Our group on the Small-Group Evening Walking Tour of London with Fish and Chips Dinner was small and intimate–six in total including our guide, Matt, who seemed to be a repository of every known fact about the history of London. Armed with his iPad, brimming with images and photographs, we set off on a journey of discovery about London’s heartland, its dark and sinister past, and its resurgence as a world financial powerhouse.

Starting at the Tower of London, illuminated by floodlights and packed with skaters on the ice rink in a former moat, the atmosphere was somewhat surreal, bordering on magical. Scratch behind the surface, however, and you were suddenly reminded of its grisly past: of beheadings, torture, imprisonment, murder and the Traitors Gate.

Following the Thames Path

We moved along the Thames Path with wonderful views of Tower BridgeHMS Belfast and the magnificent new Shard Building soaring high into the night sky, soon to be the tallest building in Europe. Ahead stood London Bridge, which was the replacement for the one sold to an American millionaire for $2.4 million and now straddles Lake Havasu City in Arizona. We were reminded that this was the spot where traitor’s heads were stuck on spikes, a stark deterrent to any potential transgressor.

Cutting right over the bridge we paused at Southwark Cathedral with its beautiful stained glass windows before descending into Borough Road Market, passing the Golden Hind, the replica of Sir Francis Drake’s galley. From there we moved on past the notorious Clink Prison before turning back to the river for one of the most beautiful views imaginable. St. Paul’s Cathedral on the right, standing majestically on Ludgate Hill; the Globe Theatre on the left, the birthplace of many of Shakespeare’s plays; and ahead the Millennium Bridge, Norman Foster’s creation, and the Tate Modern.

Seeing London lit up at night

We moved on to Blackfriars Bridge and descended down a winding staircase to a shingle beach with the waters lapping gently nearby. Huge chains and sunken staves were a reminder of the medieval harbours that dominated this part of London.  We returned to the Thames Path, moved through the crowds outside the National Theatre before passing the London Eye brightly lit in blue and turning gently in the evening air. Across the river stood Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament, iconic symbols of Britain’s imperial past.

The evening ended on a high in one of the best fish and chip restaurants in London tucked behind the Old Vic Theatre near Waterloo Station. Cod, chips, mushy peas, pickles, onions, tea, bread and butter.  What more could a man (or woman) ask for?

© Graham Walker 2012

Originally published by Viator.com